Seminar Computational Intelligence A (708.111)

WS 2015

Institut für Grundlagen der Informationsverarbeitung (708)

Lecturer:
O.Univ.-Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Maass

Office hours: by appointment (via e-mail)

E-mail: maass@igi.tugraz.at
Homepage: www.igi.tugraz.at/maass/


Assoc. Prof. Dr. Robert Legenstein

Office hours: by appointment (via e-mail)

E-mail: robert.legenstein@igi.tugraz.at
Homepage: www.igi.tugraz.at/legi/




Location: IGI-seminar room, Inffeldgasse 16b/I, 8010 Graz
Date: starting from October 12th  2015, every Monday, 16:15 - 18:00 p.m.
Zeugnis: Ein Vortrag in diesem Seminar kann auch als Zeugnis für ein anders Seminar des Institutes angerechnet werden.
(Credits: A talk in this seminar can also be used to take formal credits for other seminars of the institute.)


Content of the seminar: Memory

We will discuss in this seminar the question how memory storage is accomplished in the brain.

The organization of memory is still one of the least understood aspects of brain function. But our insight has advanced significantly through a better understanding of the molecular basis of learning and memory in the brain, in particular also through the work of Austrian-born researcher Eric Kandel, who received in 2000 the Nobel Prize for this work. Eric Kandel can also explain his results very well. Therefore we use as basis for this seminar a book coauthored by him, where he explains research results on memory in the brain by him and others to a general audience (pdf of the relevant book chapters will be made available to participants in this seminar).

Insight into the organization of memory in the brain is also of high current interest for computer technology, since shuffling of information between memory stores and processors (which is largely avoided by the brain) has been identified as primary reason why current computers consume so much more energy than the brain. In addition, new synapse-like hardware devices (memristors) are about to change how memory is stored in the next generation of digital computers. Hence IBM, Intel and many other companies are trying to use insight about the organization of memory in the brain for designing substantially more energy efficient computer chips based on memristor technology.

The students will present in this seminar chapters from the book (length of talks: 30 min).


Talks:

Date
Speaker
Talks
16.11.2015
Urak Chapter 2   SLIDES

Falk
Chapter 3   SLIDES
23.11.2015
Aigner
Chapter 5   SLIDES

Limbacher
Chapter 6   SLIDES
30.11.2015
Breitwieser
Chapter 7 (1)  SLIDES

Rad
Chapter 7 (2)  SLIDES
14.12.2015
Colovic
Chapter 8  SLIDES

Anil
Chapter 9   SLIDES
11.01.2016
Huysmans
Sleep-dependent memory triage: evolving generalization through selective processing. R. Stickgold and M. Walker. Nature Neuroscience 16(2):139-145,2013            SLIDES

Notes on talk material:

  • Ch. 1: From Mind to Molecules.
    PDF (login: lehre password: ask anyone in our Institute, or send email to us).
    • This general introduction should be read by each participant before the first talk.

  • Ch. 2: Modifiable Synapses for Nondeclarative Memory.
    PDF.

  • Ch. 3: Molecules for Short-Term Memory.
    PDF.

  • Ch. 5: Brain Systems for Declarative Memory.
    PDF.
    • Ergänzung zu Ch. 5   -   Ch. 4: Declarative Memory.   PDF
  • Ch. 6: A Synaptic Storage Mechanism for Declarative Memory.
    PDF.

  • Ch. 7: From Short-Term Memory to Long-Term Memory.
    PDF.

  • Ch. 8: Priming, Perceptual Learning, and Emotional Learning.
    PDF.

  • Ch. 9: Memory for Skills, Habits, and Conditioning.
    PDF.